Company Member Stories


A Walk with Robert Smith
Take a walk — in our imagination at least — in Robert Smith's Philadelphia.

Famous Early Members of The Carpenters' Company
A listing of the early who's who of The Carpenters' Company

Carpenters' Company Members and Independence National Historical Park
We pause to reflect on the pioneers who, without realizing it, laid the foundation for INHP.

Raphaelle Peale and Martha (Patty) McGlathery
Their story is one of love and heartache.

James M. Linnard
Lumber for the Builders.

Joshua Pancoast: A Murder in the Family
The story of a family of Carpenters.

Evan Peters, Pump Maker
Wells required a pump maker who fabricated, installed and repaired the mechanism for lifting water to the surface.

Thomas Procter and the City Tavern
Carpenters' Company member Thomas Procter designed City Tavern.

Colonel Procter's Mission to the Indians
In March, 1791, Procter set out on the least known adventure of his career, and probably the most dangerous.

City Tavern: A Feast of Elegance
The story of City Tavern, in Historic Philadelphia. John Adams called it "the most genteel one in America."

John Crump, Builder Extraordinaire
Architect, carpenter and hotel manager.

Steele Family
Five generations: builders of Philadelphia's first skyscraper, Connie Mack Stadium, and more.

Five Buildings and a Train
From Philadelphia's earliest days, craftsmen who formed The Carpenters' Company were already constructing their community.

Houses for Ships, Sailors, Music & Money
After a century or more of service, can a building be successfully recycled?

Location, Location
Houses in uncountable hundreds became the signature construction of Company members.

Following the Money
General Washington could afford to serve without pay ... but he had a bookkeeping nightmare!

A Family Affair
Sons by the dozen have followed in their fathers' occupational footsteps.

Thomas Nevell: "An ingenious House Carpenter"
During his 76-year life Thomas Nevell created a new roof and spire for Independence Hall and designed Mount Pleasant in Fairmount Park. He founded the city's — and probably the nation's — first architecture school.

William Williams: "A Firm Patriot — an Honest Man"
Into his 45 years, a member with the unlikely name of William Williams crammed experiences others could only admire.